Thursday, May 30, 2013

DAP, PAS AND PKR – A PAKATAN PARASITIC COALITION WHOSE REAL AND UNMENTIONED GOALS ARE TOTALLY OPPOSE TO EACH OF THEIR OWN.


By Mansor Puteh



At least PAS is genuine in stating their real and only goal which is to turn Malaysia into an Islamic state.

But what they have all failed to do since so long ago is to first turn their own party into an Islamic Party. PAS is not an Islamic party.

And DAP has also made known their goal in wanting to capture Putrajaya, which is really a fantasy since they can never get there on their own strength.

PKR, however, has only one goal which is to make Anwar Ibrahim prime minister.

He can be prime minister, but of Sungai Buloh as his route to Putrajaya seems to have been diverted again and again to Sungai Buloh, via Jalan Duta courts, where he has many cases to answer many of which are serious ones.

Yet, the three parties in the opposition are really opposing each others’ goals and they know they can never achieve their own personal goal.

The irony is that the three parties will soon die out when their senior and aged leaders who had tried to create oligarchies disappear one by one.

Azizan Abu Bakar has been physically and perhaps emotionally affected post-PRU-13.

The others including Nik Aziz, Kit Siang, Karpal Singh and possibly Anwar might not be able to do what they have been doing till now in the next general elections in 2018; they might be too old even to walk much less to talk.

Kit Siang is still repeating what he has been saying all these years, and he does not seem to realize that Malaysia has developed by leaps and bounds in all aspects.

The only aspect that Malaysia has not and will not be able to develop it a credible opposition.

DAP, PAS and PKR are not credible opposition.

Therefore, Malaysia does not have an opposition; what it has are people who sit on the other side of the aisle in Dewan Rakyat and Dewan Negara.

Whatever it is, DAP, PAS and PKR are in some kind of an unusual relationship where political with differing aspirations and goals can sometimes cooperate simply because their bigger goal is to eliminate Umno and Barisan, a goal they individually and collectively know to be impossible to achieve.

So their only real goal is to ensure that Umno and Barisan are shaken, but not stirred.

The future of Umno and Barisan therefore rests on how they can withstand the storm or to be more exact, to be shaken, so that it does not cause itself to be tumble.

Unfortunately, it is DAP, PAS and PKR which are causing themselves to be tumble the more they try to shake Umno and Barisan.

And the support they are getting from the voters really rests on how long they can be pushed to the corner to see Umno and Barisan in a totally different light altogether like the light they themselves have been seeing.

Sooner or later, Kit Siang, Karpal, Nik Aziz and Anwar would become old. The next general elections which can be held in 2018 can see some of them taken off the stage of public dissent. All of them would be five years older than they are now.

Yet, the second echelon leaders of their three parties cannot be cultivated fast enough to be like them, and once this happens, their supporters will back off to look elsewhere, as they see these new generation of DAP, PAS and PKR leaders to be a faint resemblance of their older ones, who are now too old to be dissenting.

Nobody knows if the new generation of Pakatan leaders can match up to the level of politically incorrect behavior and speeches that their seniors have been making all this while, to allow their party and coalition to exist in the original form or if they would cause them to be discarded.

Umno and Barisan have five years to prop up their fledging image. But this may be a strategy to hoodwink those in Pakatan and especially their supporters, who would become less vocal and expressive when they are five years older than they are now.

It seems the Pakatan thrives because of this young generation of voters who are eager to disregard the history of the country, like they can ignore their parents and their grandparents.

There is a vast ‘history gap’ between the supporters of Pakatan and Barisan.

PAS wants to establish an Islamic state in Malaysia. DAP wants to stop them from being able to do that. But they do not want the matter to be debated and fought from the different angles.

PKR only exists because they wanted to see Anwar become prime minister of the country, a goal that can never be met.

The common grounds of the three parties in Pakatan however could be leveled by their only goal which is to form the next government, but based on their different values and aspirations, all of which are too fantastic and abnormally impossible to realize.  

In the end DAP, PAS and PKR choose to remain as parasitic partners in the Pakatan Rakyat coalition which they do not dare to establish formally so that they can run in the general elections under the same banner and not under their different banners. 

No comments: